My Paternal Moravian Great Grandmother, Annie Marie “Mary” Dudika Mazac

Annie Marie "Mary" (Dudika) Mazac, Rosie Havelka (Nemec), & her Mom-Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka

Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, Rosie Havelka (Nemec), and her mom, Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka, at train station in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Birth:  Jun. 2, 1862, Hrozenkova, Vsetine, Moravia
Death:  Mar. 21, 1939
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Family links:  
 Parents:
  Tomas Dudika (1842 – 1922)
  Evy Chlevestanove Dudika (1843 – 1925)
 
 Spouse:
  Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
 
 Children:
  Rozalie Mazac Havelka (1881 – 1949)
  Albert Adolph Mazac (1884 – 1963)
  Anton Mazac (1885 – 1887)

Andrew Mazac (1886 – 1888) 

Joe #1 Mazac (1887 – 1888)
  Steve Mazac (1888 – 1888)
  Johnny Mazac (1889 – 1889)
  Robert Albert Mazac (1890 – 1983)
  Joseph Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)
  Johnny #2 Mazac (1893 – 1898)
  Marie Mazac Motloch (1894 – 1968)
  Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)
  Eva Christine Mazac McCord (1896 – 1975)
  Emma Rosa Mazac Strmiska (1896 – 1985)
  Effie Mazac Hurta (1898 – 1979)
  John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)
  Alberta Bertha Mazac Foyt (1900 – 1987)
  Olga Angeline Mazac Kovar (1901 – 1971)
  Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)
  Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny (1904 – 1999)

Inscription:
“MARIE MAZAC, NAR, CERVEN 2, 1862, which means Born on April 2, 1862, and ZEM, BREZNA 21, 1939”
(which means Born on April 2, 1862, and ZEM, BREZNA 21, 1939), which is Czech for Died on March 21, 1939.

Burial:

Holy Cross Cemetery
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA

Created by: Texas Tudors
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21074105

My Paternal Great Grandmother, Daughter of Tomas “Tom” Dudika (also spelled as Dudik) & Evy “Eve” (Chlevestanove) Dudika of Mala Bystrici, Novy Jiovin, Moravia.

Wife of Jan “John” Mazac, Mother of 20 children.

ellis-island-new-york-harbor

Emigrated on 19 January 1892 from Moravia to Ellis Island, New York, New York, then by ship to Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. Settled in Williamson County, Texas with her husband, John Mazac.

[LEO BACA’S BOOK ON CZECH IMMIGRATION: MARIE MAZAC, AGE 29, ARRIVED ON JAN. 19, 1892 IN NEW YORK ON THE SHIP EIDER FROM MORAVIA, WITH ROZALIE AGE 8, ROBERT AGE 2, AND JOSEF AGE 1/2 [6 MONTHS] BOUND FOR TEXAS. IMMIGRATION PAPERS SHOW MAZAC, MARIE, DCERA TOMASE DUDIKA, DOMKARE V MALE BYSTRICI A JEHO MANZELKY EVY CHLEVESTANOVE.]

Settled in Granger, Taylor, and Corn Hill, Williamson County, Texas areas.

Children: Rosalie, Albert, Anton, Andrew, Joe #1, Steve, Johnnie, Robert Albert, Frank, Johnny #2, Marie, Elizabeth Annie (Bessie), Emma, Effie, Eva, John Joseph, Alberta “Bertha”, Olga, Frank Joseph, and Vlasta Mary Mazac.

Loving wife, Mother, Grandmother, and Great Grandmother.

Hardworking Czech-Moravian, farmer’s wife, and a devout Catholic.

ellis-island-1892-1952-immigrants

LEO BACA’S BOOK ON CZECH IMMIGRATION: MARIE MAZAC, AGE 29, ARRIVED ON JAN. 19, 1892 IN NEW YORK ON THE SHIP EIDER FROM MORAVIA, WITH ROZALIE AGE 8, ROBERT AGE 2, AND JOSEF AGE 1/2 [6 MONTHS] BOUND FOR TEXAS. IMMIGRATION PAPERS SHOW MAZAC, MARIE, DCERA TOMASE DUDIKA, DOMKARE V MALE BYSTRICI A JEHO MANZELKY EVY CHLEVESTANOVE.

Ellis Island, New York (color)

Ellis Island, New York, New York, United States

ELLIS ISLAND – HISTORY
“From 1892 to 1954, over twelve million immigrants entered the United States through the portal of Ellis Island, a small island in New York Harbor. Ellis Island is located in the upper bay just off the New Jersey coast, within the shadow of the Statue of Liberty. Through the years, this gateway to the new world was enlarged from its original 3.3 acres to 27.5 acres mostly by landfill obtained from ship ballast and possibly excess earth from the construction of the New York City subway system. 
Before being designated as the site of the first Federal immigration station by President Benjamin Harrison in 1890, Ellis Island had a varied history. The local Indian tribes had called it “Kioshk” or Gull Island. Due to its rich and abundant oyster beds and plentiful and profitable shad runs, it was known as Oyster Island for many generations during the Dutch and English colonial periods. By the time Samuel Ellis became the island’s private owner in the 1770’s, the island had been called Kioshk, Oyster, Dyre, Bucking and Anderson’s Island. In this way, Ellis Island developed from a sandy island that barely rose above the high tide mark, into a hanging site for pirates, a harbor fort, ammunition and ordinance depot named Fort Gibson, and finally into an immigration station. 
While most immigrants entered the United States through New York Harbor (the most popular destination of steamship companies), others sailed into many ports such as Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, San Francisco and Savannah, Miami, and New Orleans. The great steamship companies like White Star, Red Star, Cunard and Hamburg-America played a significant role in the history of Ellis Island and immigration in general. First and second class passengers who arrived in New York Harbor were not required to undergo the inspection process at Ellis Island. Instead, these passengers underwent a cursory inspection aboard ship; the theory being that if a person could afford to purchase a first or second class ticket, they were less likely to become a public charge in America due to medical or legal reasons. The Federal government felt that these more affluent passengers would not end up in institutions, hospitals or become a burden to the state. However, first and second class passengers were sent to Ellis Island for further inspection if they were sick or had legal problems. 
This scenario was far different for “steerage” or third class passengers. These immigrants traveled in crowded and often unsanitary conditions near the bottom of steamships with few amenities, often spending up to two weeks seasick in their bunks during rough Atlantic Ocean crossings. Upon arrival in New York City, ships would dock at the Hudson or East River piers. First and second class passengers would disembark, pass through Customs at the piers and were free to enter the United States. The steerage and third class passengers were transported from the pier by ferry or barge to Ellis Island where everyone would undergo a medical and legal inspection.” 

source: http://www.ellisisland.org/genealogy/ellis_island_history.asp

Ellis Island, New York (color)2

Ellis Island, New York, New York, United States

St.Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church in Granger, Williamson, Texas

Member of the St.Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. Mary & John Mazac helped build the St. Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. I wish that I could have known her. I cannot fathom how horrible it would be to have five of your sons die. They died before they left Moravia. My poor great grandmother survived six weeks aboard a ship from Moravia. With the crowded, hot, and unsanitary conditions aboard a ship with your four little children. They were very poor, so I don’t know how they came up with the money for passage to America. I would have been terrified. They left to come to America for a “new life” where they had freedom from the cold winters, and to fulfill the American dream of owning their own property. “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness” lured them to America. Family and land were everything to them. They were good, hard working Catholics, and worked for everything that they had. They grew their own food in their garden, and were farmers.

Name Annie Marie Dudika Mazac
Maiden Name Dudika
Event Type Burial
Event Date 1939
Event Place Granger, Williamson, Texas, United States of America
Photograph Included Y
Birth Date 02 Jun 1862
Death Date 21 Mar 1939
Affiliate Record Identifier 21074105
Cemetery Holy Cross Cemetery
Citing this Record

“Find A Grave Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVVG-T1RN : 11 July 2016), Annie Marie Dudika Mazac, 1939; Burial, Granger, Williamson, Texas, United States of America, Holy Cross Cemetery; citing record ID 21074105, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

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